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‘Brooklyn Nine-Nine’ Recap: Family Ties – Rolling Stone

A review of this week’s Brooklyn Nine-Nine, “Gintars,” coming up just as soon as I’m too sad to drink duck broth… Jake and Amy‘s marriage has put slightly more emphasis on them as them as professional partners this season. This makes sense, and it’s been fun to see the variations in their relationship over the…

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A review of this week’s Brooklyn Nine-Nine, “Gintars,” coming up just as soon as I’m too sad to drink duck broth…

Jake and Amy‘s marriage has put slightly more emphasis on them as them as professional partners this season. This makes sense, and it’s been fun to see the variations in their relationship over the many episodes where they’ve shared the A-story. But that focus on the newlyweds has come at the expense of Jake’s best friend and other primary work sidekick, Charles, who has mostly been involved in B-stories like last week’s acting exercise.

“Gintars” is only the second episode so far this season to spotlight the Peralta/Boyle duo. It’s a good one — and a rarity for how the show has featured them together, in that it’s about Charles asserting himself and pointing out the ways in which Jake can be a bad friend.

Our inciting incident is the arrival of the title character, Gintars, birth father to Charles’ beloved son Nikolaj and generally sketchy person. (He’s played, of course, by Ike Barinholtz, TV’s go-to guy for dirtbags of various ethnic origin.) Charles is understandably concerned about Gintars disrupting his relationship with Nikolaj, but Jake takes things much too far in arranging for Gintars to be arrested and deported for selling dangerous counterfeit jeans. Jake intercedes on his pal’s behalf all the time but here he’s taken it much too far without Charles’ input. Charles rightly gets to be mad at Jake for it and to maintain the moral high ground through the episode’s closing scenes. He forgives Jake without condoning what he did, which feels like a big level of growth from a guy whose emotional life has always been in thrall to the show’s main character. On the whole, it’s a fine spotlight for Joe Lo Truglio, who gets to play Boyle at his most broad (the moans in the briefing room, the way so many conversations are framed in the context of Disney cartoons like Zootopia and The Little Mermaid) while also having genuinely hurt feelings regarding his son and his best friend.

Our subplot brings back Reggie Lee’s Dr. Yee, the forensic expert last seen in Season Five’s “Return to Skyfire,” and the object of shared professional worship by Holt and Amy. This is the two of them at their most insufferably nerdy, so the story wisely casts its sympathy with Rosa, who is skeptical that Yee’s bugs can help solve her case, and with poor germaphobe Terry, who spends most of the episode wearing different kinds of fake eyebrows and a bleached goatee after learning of all the tiny mites that live inside his facial hair. It’s a very, very old type of visual humor (one set of Terry’s fake eyebrows resemble Groucho Marx) but the kind that’s stuck around this long because it works. The contrast of handsome, superstrong Terry Crews with the way he temporarily mutilates his own face is hilarious every single time and probably the most memorable bit from another strong episode.

Some other thoughts:

* I suspect most adoptive parents I know won’t love Charles’ use of “real father” (as opposed to “birth father” or “biological father”) to describe Gintars in the final scene. The language on this issue is delicate and has evolved to reflect as much. (As Charles points out, “Adoption is complicated.”) But this is also a ridiculous show where Gintars refers to Nikolaj as “my sex result” and describes his relationship with both Nikolaj and Nikolaj’s half-brother Dragomir in ways that evoke the lyrics to “I’m My Own Grandpa,” so it may be best not to get too hung up on terminology.

* An accidentally timely joke: Gintars taunts Charles and Jake by watching Mad About You on “Latvian Hulu” in an episode airing a week after a Mad About You revival was announced. Not only that, the revival will only air on Spectrum cable which may as well be Latvian Hulu if you live in a non-Spectrum market.

* Accidentally less timely joke: Gintars blocks Nikolaj’s shot and screams out the name Kristaps Porzingis. It still makes sense that he’d invoke Latvia’s favorite basketball son, but the episode was shot in November, before Porzingis was traded from the Knicks to the Dallas Mavericks.

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Star on the Mountain was down, but now is back up and lighting the city

María Cortés González, El Paso Times Published 5:18 p.m. MT March 25, 2019 | Updated 5:36 p.m. MT March 25, 2019Buy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoAutoplayShow ThumbnailsShow CaptionsLast SlideNext SlideThe beloved Star on the Mountain was out for a few days but…

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María Cortés González, El Paso Times
Published 5:18 p.m. MT March 25, 2019 | Updated 5:36 p.m. MT March 25, 2019

Khawaja Aamir, right, a junior foreign exchange student at Andress High School, and Niko Tabdi, a senior at Andress, walk along the trail behind the El Paso Museum of Archaeology, 4301 Trans Mountain Road, on Saturday, March 23, 2019, during the 13th Annual Poppies Fest.

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A woman in costume walks by the El Paso Museum of Archaeology on Saturday, March 23, 2019, during the 13th Annual Poppies Fest.

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Juan Aguirre, right, owner of Nine One Five Apparel, and Buddy Imboden staff a booth selling El Paso-themed items on Saturday, March 23, 2019, during the 13th Annual Poppies Fest.

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Costumes were on display Saturday, March 23, 2019, during the 13th Annual Poppies Fest.

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A woman in costume smiles Saturday, March 23, 2019, during the 13th Annual Poppies Fest.

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David Ham, the director of the National Border Patrol Museum, works at the museum's booth Saturday, March 23, 2019, during the 13th Annual Poppies Fest. Texas and Border Patrol-themed items were for sale at the booth.

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Border Patrol teddy bears, as well as Texas stars, belt buckles, magnets and key fobs were for sale at the National Border Patrol Museum booth.

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Trails along and behind the El Paso Museum of Archaeology make for the best viewing of the blooms Saturday, March 23, 2019, during the 13th Annual Poppies Fest.

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Besides enjoying poppies, people at the festival could take part in archery training.

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Lynn, Steve and Jessica Chavira were selling diverse variety of jerky near the El Paso Museum of Archaeology on Saturday, March 23, 2019, during the 13th Annual Poppies Fest. They sell dozens of varieties of jerky, including original, teriyaki, kale, watermelon, menudo and vegan jerky. Their store is at 5720 Trans Mountain, Suite D, and they also sell jerky at the Downtown Artist and Farmers Market.

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Miguel Martinez of El Paso Images mans a booth for his business Saturday, March 23, 2019, during the 13th Annual Poppies Fest. The booth offers tiles with iconic El Paso images, as well as photos, mouse pads and more.

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Aimee Mack relaxes before the crowds start to grow Saturday, March 23, 2019, during the 13th Annual Poppies Fest.

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Alondra Rojas, Aimee Mack and Tiffany Ward take part Saturday, March 23, 2019, in the 13th Annual Poppies Fest.

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El Paso's beautiful scenery along Trans Mountain Road is another draw Saturday, March 23, 2019, during the 13th Annual Poppies Fest.

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Take a walk along the trail behind the El Paso Archaeology Museum for scenic views of poppies and other plant life.

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Poppies dot the landscape Saturday, March 23, 2019, during the 13th Annual Poppies Fest.

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Vendors offer everything from mementos to food Saturday, March 23, 2019, during the 13th Annual Poppies Fest.

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The landscape surrounding the El Paso Museum of Archaeology offers plenty of other things to look at besides poppies Saturday, March 23, 2019, during the 13th Annual Poppies Fest.

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The beloved Star on the Mountain was out for a few days but is back up, officials say.

The star’s lights went off March 13 because of heavy winds, a Chamber of Commerce representative said.

Things to see, hear, do: Make the most of life in El Paso with a digital subscription to the El Paso Times 

The star, however, was fixed and was up and running by Sunday.

The star, which is 459 feet in length and 278 feet in width, can be seen just above Scenic Drive. From its lofty spot, the star can be seen from the east, 100 miles from the air and 30 miles from the ground, according to Times archives.

More: El Paso’s Star on the Mountain originated as Christmas ornament

The star became a nightly feature in the El Paso skyline in 1993, as a joint project of the Greater El Paso Chamber of Commerce and El Paso Electric Co.

El Pasoans can sponsor the star to be lighted in a loved one’s honor or for special occasions.

María Cortés González may be reached at 546-6150; mcortes@elpasotimes.com; @EPTMaria on Twitter.

Read or Share this story: https://www.elpasotimes.com/story/news/2019/03/25/star-mountain-down-chamber-says-its-restored-and-operating/3268676002/

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Texas counties removed 14 voters from the rolls in citizenship review

Alexa Ura, Texas Tribune Published 11:19 a.m. MT March 18, 2019 | Updated 1:34 p.m. MT March 18, 2019Buy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy PhotoBuy…

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Alexa Ura, Texas Tribune
Published 11:19 a.m. MT March 18, 2019 | Updated 1:34 p.m. MT March 18, 2019

Veronica Escobar who is running to replace Beto O’Rourke in the 16th Congressional Disctrict met with voters outside of Sierra Vista Elementary School in El Paso’s eastside. A steady stream of voters were coming to the polls which included first time voters to veteran voters.

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Veronica Escobar who is running to replace Beto O’Rourke in the 16th Congressional Disctrict met with voters outside of Sierra Vista Elementary School in El Paso’s eastside. A steady stream of voters were coming to the polls which included first time voters to veteran voters.

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Veronica Escobar who is running to replace Beto O’Rourke in the 16th Congressional Disctrict met with voters outside of Sierra Vista Elementary School in El Paso’s eastside. A steady stream of voters were coming to the polls which included first time voters to veteran voters.

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Veronica Escobar who is running to replace Beto O’Rourke in the 16th Congressional Disctrict met with voters outside of Sierra Vista Elementary School in El Paso’s eastside. A steady stream of voters were coming to the polls which included first time voters to veteran voters.

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Veronica Escobar who is running to replace Beto O’Rourke in the 16th Congressional Disctrict met with voters outside of Sierra Vista Elementary School in El Paso’s eastside. A steady stream of voters were coming to the polls which included first time voters to veteran voters.

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Veronica Escobar who is running to replace Beto O’Rourke in the 16th Congressional Disctrict met with voters outside of Sierra Vista Elementary School in El Paso’s eastside. A steady stream of voters were coming to the polls which included first time voters to veteran voters.

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Senate candidate Beto O'Rourke visits polling stations on election day Tuesday in El Paso. O'Rourke will hold his election night watch party at Southwest University Park.

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Senate candidate Beto O'Rourke visits polling stations on election day Tuesday in El Paso. O'Rourke will hold his election night watch party at Southwest University Park.

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Senate candidate Beto O'Rourke visits polling stations on election day Tuesday in El Paso. O'Rourke will hold his election night watch party at Southwest University Park.

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Senate candidate Beto O'Rourke visits polling stations on Election Day Nov. 6, 2018, in El Paso. O'Rourke later held his election night watch party at Southwest University Park.

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Senate candidate Beto O'Rourke visits polling stations on election day Tuesday in El Paso. O'Rourke will hold his election night watch party at Southwest University Park.

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Senate candidate Beto O'Rourke visits polling stations on election day Tuesday in El Paso. O'Rourke will hold his election night watch party at Southwest University Park.

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Senate candidate Beto O'Rourke visits polling stations on election day Tuesday in El Paso. O'Rourke will hold his election night watch party at Southwest University Park.

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Senate candidate Beto O'Rourke visits polling stations on election day Tuesday in El Paso. O'Rourke will hold his election night watch party at Southwest University Park.

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Senate candidate Beto O'Rourke visits polling stations on election day Tuesday in El Paso. O'Rourke will hold his election night watch party at Southwest University Park.

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Senate candidate Beto O'Rourke visits polling stations on election day Tuesday in El Paso. O'Rourke will hold his election night watch party at Southwest University Park.

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Senate candidate Beto O'Rourke visits polling stations on election day Tuesday in El Paso. O'Rourke will hold his election night watch party at Southwest University Park.

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Senate candidate Beto O'Rourke visits polling stations on election day Tuesday in El Paso. O'Rourke will hold his election night watch party at Southwest University Park.

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Satellite trucks from various news outlets mostly from Texas line the street outside the West entrance to Southwest University Park Tuesday where Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Beto O’Rourke will hold his election watch party.
A small but steady stream of voters cast their ballots inside Fire Station 15 at 115 Shorty Lane near Doniphan Drive and Sunset Road Tuesday morning in El Paso’s Upper Valley.
Campaign workers stand outside Fire Station 27 at 6767 Ojo de Agua Tuesday in West El Paso.
U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, who is running to unseat Sen. Ted Cruz, stopped at Mesiat Elementary School to greet volunteers and voters early Tuesday morning. O’Rourke who earlier had walked from his Sunset Heights home in El Paso to vote at the El Paso Community College Rio Grande Campus, was all smiles as voters asked to tae pictures with him.

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U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, who is running to unseat Sen. Ted Cruz, stopped at Mesiat Elementary School to greet volunteers and voters early Tuesday morning. O’Rourke who earlier had walked from his Sunset Heights home in El Paso to vote at the El Paso Community College Rio Grande Campus, was all smiles as voters asked to tae pictures with him.

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U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, who is running to unseat Sen. Ted Cruz, stopped at Mesiat Elementary School to greet volunteers and voters early Tuesday morning. O’Rourke who earlier had walked from his Sunset Heights home in El Paso to vote at the El Paso Community College Rio Grande Campus, was all smiles as voters asked to tae pictures with him.

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U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, who is running to unseat Sen. Ted Cruz, stopped at Mesiat Elementary School to greet volunteers and voters early Tuesday morning. O’Rourke who earlier had walked from his Sunset Heights home in El Paso to vote at the El Paso Community College Rio Grande Campus, was all smiles as voters asked to tae pictures with him.

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U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, who is running to unseat Sen. Ted Cruz, stopped at Mesiat Elementary School to greet volunteers and voters early Tuesday morning. O’Rourke who earlier had walked from his Sunset Heights home in El Paso to vote at the El Paso Community College Rio Grande Campus, was all smiles as voters asked to tae pictures with him.

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U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, who is running to unseat Sen. Ted Cruz, stopped at Mesiat Elementary School to greet volunteers and voters early Tuesday morning. O’Rourke who earlier had walked from his Sunset Heights home in El Paso to vote at the El Paso Community College Rio Grande Campus, was all smiles as voters asked to tae pictures with him.

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U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, who is running to unseat Sen. Ted Cruz, stopped at Mesiat Elementary School to greet volunteers and voters early Tuesday morning. O’Rourke who earlier had walked from his Sunset Heights home in El Paso to vote at the El Paso Community College Rio Grande Campus, was all smiles as voters asked to tae pictures with him.

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El Pasoans are heading out to their voting precincts early Tuesday morning. Here voters at Fire Station #3 cast their votes.

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El Pasoans are heading out to their voting precincts early Tuesday morning. Here voters at Fire Station #3 cast their votes.

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Volunteers for various candidates stand outside of Mesita Elementary School early Tuesday morning shortly after the polls opened.

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U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, who is running to unseat Sen. Ted Cruz, walked from his Sunset Heights home in El Paso to vote at the El Paso Community College Rio Grande Campus Tuesday.

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U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, who is running to unseat Sen. Ted Cruz, walked from his Sunset Heights home in El Paso to vote at the El Paso Community College Rio Grande Campus Tuesday.

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U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, who is running to unseat Sen. Ted Cruz, walked from his Sunset Heights home in El Paso to vote at the El Paso Community College Rio Grande Campus Tuesday.

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U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, who is running to unseat Sen. Ted Cruz, walked from his Sunset Heights home in El Paso to vote at the El Paso Community College Rio Grande Campus Tuesday.

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U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, who is running to unseat Sen. Ted Cruz, walked from his Sunset Heights home in El Paso to vote at the El Paso Community College Rio Grande Campus Tuesday.

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U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, who is running to unseat Sen. Ted Cruz, walked from his Sunset Heights home in El Paso to vote at the El Paso Community College Rio Grande Campus Tuesday.

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U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, who is running to unseat Sen. Ted Cruz, walked from his Sunset Heights home in El Paso to vote at the El Paso Community College Rio Grande Campus Tuesday.

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U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, who is running to unseat Sen. Ted Cruz, walked from his Sunset Heights home in El Paso to vote at the El Paso Community College Rio Grande Campus Tuesday.

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U.S. Rep. Beto O'Rourke, who is running to unseat Sen. Ted Cruz, walked from his Sunset Heights home in El Paso to vote at the El Paso Community College Rio Grande Campus Tuesday.

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Fourteen Texas voters caught up in the secretary of state’s botched review of the voter rolls for supposed noncitizens had their registrations canceled but have since been reinstated, state officials told a federal judge Friday.

The Texas Attorney General’s Office informed the San Antonio court judge as part of the ongoing litigation over the state’s error-riddled review, through which almost 100,000 individuals were marked as possible noncitizens. Seven counties marked the voting registration of 14 individuals as canceled because the voters had failed to respond to letters that demanded they prove their citizenship.

Counties were canceling voters’ registrations as recently as Wednesday — well after federal District Judge Fred Biery halted the review effort on Feb. 27 and ordered local officials to hold off on removing any voters from the voter rolls without his approval.

The cancellations affected voters in Coke, DeWitt, Matagorda, Montague, Victoria, Willacy and Zavala counties.

In some cases, voters hit the 30-day deadline they were given to provide their local voter registrar with proof that they are U.S. citizens and therefore eligible to vote, according to a review by the secretary of state’s office. Two voters in DeWitt County were canceled on Feb. 4 before the end of that 30-day period because their notices were returned as undeliverable. In Willacy County, officials “mistakenly” removed an individual from the voter rolls on Feb. 20 before the end of that period.

More: ‘Voter purge’ controversy: Texas Secretary of State grilled at confirmation hearing

The Texas secretary of state initiated the review effort in late January when it distributed lists of about 98,000 individuals it listed as “possible non-U.S. citizens” because they had provided the state with information that showed they were not citizens when they obtained a driver’s license or ID card. The lists were shipped off to counties with instructions for how local officials should review and investigate those voters by using the proof-of-citizenship letters.

At least 25,000 of those individuals were erroneously flagged by the state because of a mix-up between the secretary of state’s office and the Department of Public Safety, which had provided the data on which the review was based. But the methods used to compose the entire list remain questionable.

State election officials based their review on DPS data they knew would not account for individuals who became naturalized citizens after obtaining a driver’s license or ID card.

It’s unclear how many of the 14 voters whose registrations were canceled are not actually U.S. citizens. Counties canceled their registrations because they did not respond to the notices.

But officials in the secretary of state’s office have said they knew naturalized citizens could be swept up in the review because individuals who become naturalized citizens do not have to update DPS on their citizenship status before their licenses or IDs expire.

In temporarily blocking the purging of any voters as part of the citizenship review, Biery described the state’s review effort as a “mess” that burdened “perfectly legal naturalized Americans” who received “ham-handed and threatening” letters asking them to prove their citizenship within 30 days to avoid being kicked off the voter.

“No native born Americans were subjected to such treatment,” Biery wrote.

This article originally appeared in The Texas Tribune at texastribune.org. The Texas Tribune is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.

Read or Share this story: https://www.elpasotimes.com/story/news/2019/03/18/voters-removed-during-voter-roll-review-reinstated/3182201002/

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El Paso Spring Break Begins With a Flurry

Buy Photo None Carlos Cepeda, 13, tries to stay warm as he hikes the Franklin Mountains Saturday afternoon. Spring break began with a snowstorm in El Paso. Mark Lambie/El Paso Times Buy Photo None Families took to Transmountain Drive Saturday to enjoy a rare March snowfall in the higher elevations. Mark Lambie / El Paso…

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Carlos Cepeda, 13, tries to stay warm as he hikes the Franklin Mountains Saturday afternoon. Spring break began with a snowstorm in El Paso.

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Carlos Cepeda, 13, tries to stay warm as he hikes the Franklin Mountains Saturday afternoon. Spring break began with a snowstorm in El Paso.

Mark Lambie/El Paso Times

Families took to Transmountain Drive Saturday to enjoy a rare March snowfall in the higher elevations.

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Families took to Transmountain Drive Saturday to enjoy a rare March snowfall in the higher elevations.

Mark Lambie / El Paso Times

People took to Trans Mountain Road on Saturday, March 16, 2019, to enjoy a rare March snowfall in the higher elevations. The road was closed earlier in the day while crews worked to make it safe.

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People took to Trans Mountain Road on Saturday, March 16, 2019, to enjoy a rare March snowfall in the higher elevations. The road was closed earlier in the day while crews worked to make it safe.

Mark Lambie/El Paso Times

Families took to Transmountain Drive Saturday to enjoy a rare March snowfall in the higher elevations.

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Families took to Transmountain Drive Saturday to enjoy a rare March snowfall in the higher elevations.

Mark Lambie / El Paso Times

Families took to Transmountain Drive Saturday to enjoy a rare March snowfall in the higher elevations.

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Families took to Transmountain Drive Saturday to enjoy a rare March snowfall in the higher elevations.

Mark Lambie / El Paso Times

Families took to Transmountain Drive Saturday to enjoy a rare March snowfall in the higher elevations.

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Families took to Transmountain Drive Saturday to enjoy a rare March snowfall in the higher elevations.

Mark Lambie / El Paso Times

Families took to Transmountain Drive Saturday to enjoy a rare March snowfall in the higher elevations.

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Families took to Transmountain Drive Saturday to enjoy a rare March snowfall in the higher elevations.

Mark Lambie / El Paso Times

First-time El Paso visitor Stephanie Kowal makes a stop Saturday, March 16, 2019, in the Franklin Mountains to enjoy the snow as she travels from San Diego to Charleston, South Carolina.

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First-time El Paso visitor Stephanie Kowal makes a stop Saturday, March 16, 2019, in the Franklin Mountains to enjoy the snow as she travels from San Diego to Charleston, South Carolina. “I didn’t know you got snow in Texas,” she said.

Mark Lambie/El Paso Times

People take a selfie while enjoying the snow Saturday, March 16, 2019, on Trans Mountain Road.

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People take a selfie while enjoying the snow Saturday, March 16, 2019, on Trans Mountain Road.

Mark Lambie/El Paso Times

A family enjoys a rare March snow day atop Trans Mountain Road on Saturday, March 16, 2019.

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A family enjoys a rare March snow day atop Trans Mountain Road on Saturday, March 16, 2019.

Mark Lambie/El Paso Times

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